On vengeance

Jared Diamond in the New Yorker begins his piece on vengeance in tribal societies and what it tells about our needs to get even as follows:

In 1992, when Daniel Wemp was about twenty-two years old, his beloved paternal uncle Soll was killed in a battle against the neighboring Ombal clan. In the New Guinea Highlands, where Daniel and his Handa clan live, uncles and aunts play a big role in raising children, so an uncle’s death represents a much heavier blow than it might to most Americans. Daniel often did not even distinguish between his biological father and other male clansmen of his father’s generation. And Soll had been very good to Daniel, who recalled him as a tall and handsome man, destined to become a leader. Soll’s death demanded vengeance.

Daniel told me that responsibility for arranging revenge usually falls on the victim’s firstborn son or, failing that, on one of his brothers. “Soll did have a son, but he was only six years old at the time of his father’s death, much too young to organize the revenge,” Daniel said. “On the other hand, my father was felt to be too old and weak by then; the avenger should be a strong young man in his prime. So I was the one who became expected to avenge Soll.” As it turned out, it took three years, twenty-nine more killings, and the sacrifice of three hundred pigs before Daniel succeeded in discharging this responsibility.

Take a look!

PS: Link via B-squared.

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2 Responses to “On vengeance”

  1. Dilip Muralidaran Says:

    damn!

  2. Anthropologising Diamond « Entertaining Research Says:

    […] Rex at Savage Minds comments on the piece by Jared Diamond in New Yorker on vengeance (that I linked to earlier); of course, Rex is not fully happy with Diamond’s treatment: Treating contemporary violence […]

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