Mirror for the bracelet on your wrist

That is how Sunanda K Datta-Ray describes Guha’s latest book:

The homely Bengali saying that you don’t need a mirror to see the bracelet on your wrist comes repeatedly to mind ploughing through these 900 pages. True, the mirror illuminates intricacies of design that may not be obvious to the naked eye; true also, Ramachandra Guha’s magnum opus is couched in always pleasant and sometimes elegant prose. But why this gargantuan regurgitation of facts with which we have lived all our lives? That question nagged me all the way to page 756 when suspicion became certainty. This book is not for you and me. It’s for Western, mainly American, readers for whom “The History of the World’s Largest Democracy” means an appropriately massive tome.

Guha’s indefatigable research produces many nuggets. As for a verdict, I can do no better than cite the author’s tale of the comic actor, Johnny Walker, answering every query with the reply, “Boss, phipty-phipty.” Guha is phipty-phipty successful. The book is eminently readable and unexceptionable in so far as it goes. But for all its length, it doesn’t go far enough in examining, analysing, explaining and — yes! — criticizing where criticism is called for.

Take a look!

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One Response to “Mirror for the bracelet on your wrist”

  1. quero emagrecer rápido oque devo fazer Says:

    quero emagrecer rápido oque devo fazer

    Mirror for the bracelet on your wrist | Entertaining Research

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